Oconee Estate Planning Blog

Serving Oconee County Georgia and the Surrounding Area

What are Typical Estate Planning Documents?

For many people, eight documents form the foundation of an estate plan. It’s not that difficult a project as it seems, explains the article “8 Documents That Are Essential to Planning Your Estate” from msn.com. When you’ve completed your estate plan, you’ll also gain the peace of mind of knowing that you’ve done what was needed to protect your family. It’s well worth the effort.

Last will and testament. This is the basic document that gives you the ability to tell your family what you want to happen with your assets. It is used to name an executor—a person who will be in charge of managing your estate. Your will is also where you name a guardian who will be in charge of raising minor children. You can use the will to convey funeral instructions, but you may want to do that in a separate document, in case your will isn’t found right away. Your estate planning attorney will help you figure out the best way to handle that.

What happens if you don’t have a will? In that case, a probate court will determine who will be your executor. It might be a spouse, a grown child, or someone you don’t know or would not want to handle your estate. It’s best to have a will and select your executor yourself. When your estate goes through probate, all of the information in your will becomes part of the public record, so don’t put anything in your will, like passwords or account numbers.

Revocable living trust. Trusts are used to pass assets and property without going through probate. Your estate planning attorney will help create the trust and you’ll decide who will be in charge of it upon your death. You can be the trustee while you are living, but then you lose any estate tax benefits. If you have substantial property or wealth, trusts are a good tool to control assets and save on estate taxes.

Beneficiary designations. Any time you purchase a new insurance policy or a retirement plan, you are asked to name a beneficiary. If your first job came with a retirement plan, you likely also named a beneficiary for that plan. These designations allow the assets to pass directly to the beneficiary upon your death. They aren’t included in your will and they don’t go through probate. The biggest problem with beneficiary designations? Neglecting to update them through the many changes in life. Review and update your beneficiary designations on a regular basis.

Durable power of attorney. This document allows you to name the person to act on your behalf, if you become incapacitated because of illness or injury. They can manage your legal and financial affairs. Here’s an important point: if you become incapacitated, you cannot assign this role to someone. It needs to be done when you are legally competent.

Health care power of attorney and living will. The health care power of attorney lets someone else make medical decisions on your behalf, if you are too sick to do so yourself. The living will gives you the opportunity to explain what kind of care you do or do not want if you are close to death. If the idea of staying alive on a heart machine makes you unhappy, for instance, you can document your wishes, so loved ones don’t have to wonder what you want.

Digital assets. Much of our lives are lived online, and we have assets that won’t be found in a search of the attic or basement. Each online platform that you use may have a directive process, where you can clearly state who you want to have access to your digital assets and what you would like to have happen to them upon your death.

A letter of intent. Writing a letter of intent is a way to convey your wishes to loved ones for what you’d like to happen after you die. It may not be legally enforceable, like a will or a trust, but your loved ones will appreciate knowing what you want for funeral planning or a memorial service.

List of important documents. Sparing your family a post-mortem scavenger hunt is a gift to the living. Make a list of documents and make sure they know where important documents can be found. Include a list of routine bills, the professionals you rely on, including contact information and account numbers. Some families use a briefcase to store the important papers, but a fireproof and waterproof safe is more secure.

Reference: msn.com (June 19, 2021) “8 Documents That Are Essential to Planning Your Estate”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Attorney, Last Will and Testament, Letter of Intent, Digital Assets, Health Care Power of Attorney, Living Will, Beneficiary Designations, Heir, Probate, Trusts, Taxes, Guardian

There are Rules for Social Security when Someone Dies

Notifying Social Security about a death is one of a handful of must-do’s shortly after a loved one dies. If this task is not done promptly, says U.S. News & World Report in the recent article titled “How to Report a Death to Social Security,” then there may be problems and extra work in the future.

Here are the four steps that need to take place.

Report the death to the Social Security Administration. The funeral director might offer to do this.  However, it may be best if the family does it, so you don’t have to share the decedent’s Social Security information. You can call the SSA directly or contact the local Social Security office. This cannot be done online. It must be done on the phone. You will need the decedent’s complete date of birth and their Social Security number.

Review Social Security payments. Social Security benefits arrive the month after the month to which they apply. For example, a February benefit will arrive in March, the March benefit arrives in April, and so on. However, the day that a person dies, those benefits stop on that day. There’s no such thing as a grace period or partial payment for the month.

If the person dies during March, they won’t be eligible to get benefits for March. They will receive benefits for February, but not for March. It doesn’t matter if they die on the last day in the month or on the first day.

What if you receive a check for the month the person died? Mail the check back to the Social Security Administration. Keep the person’s bank account open, if the deposit is made directly to the account to allow the SSA to retrieve the last payment.

What about the one-time SS death benefit? Once the death has been reported, there may be a one-time death benefit of $255, sent to the surviving spouse, if they were living with the deceased. If the surviving spouse was living separately but is still eligible for benefits on the deceased’s record, the one-time payment may still be sent. If there is no surviving spouse, the death benefit can be sent to a child who is eligible for benefits based on the deceased’s record.

Arranging benefits for family members from Social Security. Depending upon the circumstances, family members may still be eligible to receive benefits. There will be paperwork. The best advice? Don’t delay, as when you apply will impact when benefits begin. Here are the family members who may be eligible for benefits after a death:

  • A disabled widow or widower age 50 and older
  • A widow or widower age 60 or older
  • A widow or widower of any age caring for a child of the deceased under age 16, who is also disabled.
  • An unmarried child of the deceased younger than 18, or 19 if they are a full-time student in elementary or secondary school
  • A stepchild, grandchild, step-grandchild or adopted child in certain circumstances
  • An unmarried child with a disability that began before age 22
  • Parents who were dependent on the deceased for at least half of their support who are at least 62
  • A surviving divorced spouse, but only in certain circumstances

The surviving spouse has several options regarding how and when to take which benefits. For instance, the surviving spouse may be able to apply for their own benefit plus a survivor’s benefit, but not at the same time. For instance, it may make sense to take a survivor’s benefit for several years and delay taking your own benefit, and then later take the surviving spouse’s own SS benefits when they are larger.

Reference: U.S. News & World Report (June 9, 2021) “How to Report a Death to Social Security”

Suggested Key Terms: Social Security Administration, Surviving Spouse, Widow, Widower, Death Benefit

What Is the Required Minimum Distribution for 2021?

There have been a number of changes to the requirements for RMDs—Required Minimum Distributions—from traditional retirement accounts, says a recent article titled “2 Essential Strategies for Taking Your RMDs” from Kiplinger. In 2019, the age for RMDs was raised from 70½ to 72. In 2020, they were waived altogether because of the pandemic. Now they’re back, and you want to know how to make good decisions about them.

Most people take the default approach, taking a lump sum of cash at the start or the end of the year. This is not the best approach. Investment markets and your own need for income are better indicators for how and when to take your RMD. If you can at all avoid it, never take an RMD from a declining market.

You can take your RMD anytime during the calendar year, from January 1 to December 31. If it’s the first time you’ve taken an RMD, you get a bonus: you can wait until April 1 of the year after your 72nd birthday. The RMD is calculated, by dividing the account balance on December 31 of the preceding year by your life expectancy factor, based on your age. You can find it in the IRS’s Uniform Lifetime Table.

2021 distributions will be bigger, and not just because of the market’s 2020 performance. Instead, distributions will be bigger because of how the accounts are designed, with RMDs becoming a larger percentage over time. It starts as a small percentage and eventually becomes the entire account, which is then depleted. Remember, the sole purpose of the RMD is to force retirees to take money out of their retirement accounts and pay taxes on the money.

Many retirees take RMDs because they need the money to live on. Here’s where money management gets tricky. It’s far easier to take smaller amounts of money at regular intervals, kind of like a paycheck, than taking a big amount once a year. We’re creatures of habit and are used to receiving income and managing it that way.

Distributions on a regular basis also fosters a better sense of how much money you have to live on, encouraging you to create and adhere to a budget.

If you don’t need the income, taking money through regular installments also has an advantage. It’s like the opposite of dollar-cost averaging. Instead of putting money into the market in small increments over time to even out market ups and downs, you’re taking money out of the market at regular intervals. You’re not cashing out at the market’s lowest point, or at the highest. And if you’re reinvesting RMDs in a taxable account, this strategy works especially well.

Reference: Kiplinger (June 10, 2021) “2 Essential Strategies for Taking Your RMDs”

Suggested Key Terms: Required Minimum Distributions, RMDs, Retirement Accounts, Retirement, Dollar-Cost Averaging, Distributions, IRS, Life Expectancy Factor

Can I Create a Stress-free Asset Transfer?

We can all agree that end-of-life planning is a sensitive topic. Nonetheless, taking the time to consider a loved one’s estate and distribution of wealth can set the family at ease and also make certain that there is a smooth transition of assets, without unnecessary legal hurdles or headaches.

MarketWatch’s article entitled “3 tips for navigating estate planning with loved ones” explains that, if you’re thinking about starting the process of estate planning with a close family member, like an elderly parent or a new spouse, read these recommendations:

  1. Stress the ultimate benefit of peace of mind. Estate planning helps the transfer of assets in an efficient and less stressful manner. It also minimizes estate tax liability of your assets when you die. Most of all, your loved ones will benefit with the peace of mind.
  2. Be as open as you can. Be honest and communicate openly about your loved one’s wishes on how they would like to distribute their estate and wealth either during life or death. Many assumptions can be made about end-of-life financial planning, like parents who assume their children will not fight when dividing their assets. This can put a lot of stress on surviving siblings, so communicate clear expectations during the planning process. It is also important to take some time to consider trustees and executors, and to encourage your parent or spouse to name an executor who is organized and thorough. Once this individual is named, be sure he or she understands the location of all of your loved one’s assets.
  3. Use care with beneficiary selections. Naming beneficiaries can have important tax implications. It is common to name a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA account, when your children are young. However, as they grow up, this can be an issue. When an IRA is distributed to a trust, it triggers taxes. The assets will be taxed immediately before being distributed to beneficiaries. Name children as direct beneficiaries of their IRA, so that they have other options available to them. Many of these may provide significant tax savings.

One more thought: using “transfer on death” designations for individual accounts is similar to a beneficiary designation for a retirement account. However, it permits your parent or spouse to name beneficiaries when they pass and prevents their money from going through a lengthy and expensive probate.

The best time to discuss estate planning with your parents is now. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to guide you through this process.

Reference: MarketWatch (June 5, 2021) “3 tips for navigating estate planning with loved ones”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Wills, Probate Court, Inheritance, Asset Protection Executor, Personal Representative, Trustee, Beneficiary Designations, Transfer on Death (TOD)

Will Vets Get Relief for Toxic Exposure?

The Military Times’ recent article entitled “Millions of vets could get new benefits under toxic exposure legislation. But can it become law?” says that Congress could be headed to another round of legislative fighting and advocacy heartbreak in the attempt to gain full recognition of the danger of burn pit exposure and other military contaminant hazards.

“We know the path ahead still won’t be easy, but with the commitment we’re seeing today, the possibility of passing comprehensive toxic exposure legislation has never been greater,” said Joy Illem, national legislative director for Disabled American Veterans, during a Capitol Hill press conference on Wednesday. “This is long overdue.”

This legislation is thought to be the most ambitious legislation on the topic of military toxic exposure since the Agent Orange Act of 1991, which for the first time granted presumptive disability benefits status to all troops who served in Vietnam because of the widespread use there of the chemical defoliant Agent Orange.

“Toxic exposure is a cost of war,” said committee Chairman Mark Takano, D-Calif. “It’s time America makes good on our promise to care for all veterans exposed to toxic substances.”

The bill adds hypertension to the list of illnesses covered for Vietnam vets. This will potentially grant 150,000 elderly veterans, access to disability payouts. The legislation also includes presumptive status for radiation poisoning for thousands of additional veterans who served in areas where nuclear testing and weaponry was used. However, the most significant part of the bill would be recognition that all troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan likely suffered some level of poisoning from burn pits used extensively throughout the country (despite the fact that the scientific specifics on the chemical vapors present is still incomplete). The legislation creates a list of 23 cancers and respiratory illnesses believed linked to the toxic smoke, allowing those who served in the countries and later contract the conditions to bypass eligibility and verification processes for VA benefits.

“If we can get those presumptions, that’s a major strategic victory,” said Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-Calif., a former emergency room doctor who has been pushing for burn pit legislation for several years. “This must be the year that we send a bill to the president and turn it into law, and the most important part is the extensive list of presumptions.”

More than 3.5 million veterans could see some benefit change under the scope of the House bill.

Reference: Military Times (May 26, 2021) “Millions of vets could get new benefits under toxic exposure legislation. But can it become law?”

Suggested Key Terms: VA Benefits, Veterans, Military, Legislation

What Happens to My Mortgage When I Die?

State and federal laws determine what happens to a home and the mortgage when the owner dies, explains Forbes’ recent article entitled “What Happens To Your Mortgage Debt When You Die?” The owner also has a say, provided they do some basic estate planning—like creating a will or trust, designating beneficiaries and perhaps purchasing life insurance.

When you pass away, all of your liabilities and assets—including your house—become part of your estate, which then must be settled. If you have a will, you’ve named an executor to handle this. Part of this responsibility is to take inventory of everything you own and determine who gets what among heirs and creditors. However, if you die without a will or trust, state probate court will direct the court to appoint someone to settle your estate. It’s typically a spouse, an adult child, or closest relative. Whoever this person is, he or she must determine who is named on the deed, who holds the title to your home and whether you have created a living trust or transfer-on-death deed to keep your home out of probate. This can save your heirs money and can expedite the property’s transfer.

If you’re the sole owner and don’t have a living trust or transfer-on-death deed, but you made a will and want to transfer your home to an heir, here’s what would happen next.

If your will names an heir to your home, that person will not have to take over your mortgage, provided they aren’t co-borrowers or co-signers on your loan. However, federal law does allow your heirs to take over the mortgage. If you leave your mortgaged home to your son, for example, the mortgage servicer must honor his request to become the new mortgagee (the borrower). He doesn’t have to qualify and demonstrate an ability to repay the loan. This rule covering the assumption of a mortgage also applies after the death of a spouse, although many spouses are often co-borrowers on a mortgage and co-owners of a home already. Despite the fact that most mortgages have a due-on-sale clause that normally requires the mortgage to be repaid in full when the property’s ownership changes, it doesn’t apply when an heir takes over.

However, the lender still can foreclose, if the assumed heir stops making payments. You can provide funds, by leaving your heir other assets or by naming them as a beneficiary on a life insurance policy.

If you die with other debts that can’t be repaid from your estate, state law may require the executor to sell your house to help repay those debts. If the proceeds from selling the home are more than the debts owed, the individual(s) who inherits your house will get the excess. Life insurance can help repay your debts at death, so your heir can inherit your home.

Note that your estate doesn’t have to pay off your mortgage. Since your mortgage is secured by your home, the mortgage servicer can foreclose and sell the home to get back the money owed.

If you’re an heir or an executor of an estate (or both), you’ll need to deal with the house and the mortgage when the homeowner dies. You can do any of the following:

  • Keep making mortgage payments
  • Pay off the mortgage
  • Refinance the mortgage
  • Sell the home; or
  • Let the lender foreclose.

Reference: Forbes (April 20, 2021) “What Happens To Your Mortgage Debt When You Die?”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, Estate Planning, Probate Court, Financial Planning, Inheritance, Transfer-On-Death Deed (TOD), Life Insurance

What Financial Actions Can Be Taken if Mom Has Alzheimer’s?

Because of the debilitating impact of Alzheimer’s and related forms of dementia on a senior’s ability to make sound financial decisions, the sooner you can get financial matters in order the better, says The (Florence, AL) Courier Journal’s recent article entitled “4 Financial Steps When Dealing with Alzheimer’s.”

Here are four important steps to take:

  1. Watch for signs of unusual financial activity. Discrepancies with money can frequently be a signal of cognitive challenges. Red flags may include difficulty paying a proper amount for an item, leaving bills unpaid, or making odd purchases.
  2. Name a power of attorney. Many people are hesitant to give control of their personal finances to another. However, it’s important to have an honest discussion with your family member and discuss looking out for their interests. Identify a person who can be trusted to manage day-to-day money matters, if necessary. This person should be designated as financial power-of-attorney, with the authority to sign checks, pay bills and monitor the senior’s finances.
  3. Prepare proper documentation. A senior must be deemed competent to complete or update estate planning documents. It is important to be certain that the named beneficiaries are up-to-date.
  4. Examine care expense and how it will be covered. Create a strategy for how the senior will be cared for, if their cognitive abilities deteriorate over time. Make decisions about whether specialized care will be needed (either in the home or in a nursing or assisted living facility). Long-term care insurance should also be considered to help with costs. Speak to an elder law attorney about trusts that can be established to provide for care for the disabled individual, while still protecting the family’s assets.

Delaying for too long to address financial issues after an Alzheimer’s diagnosis can make an already stressful and emotional time even worse.

Take action to address the situation, as soon as you are aware that it could be a problem. Even creating a plan for addressing these issues before a form of dementia is firmly diagnosed makes sense.

See an experienced elder law attorney for guidance on how to manage these challenging times.

Reference: The (Florence, AL) Courier Journal (June 8, 2021) “4 Financial Steps When Dealing with Alzheimer’s”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, Disability, Elder Care, Power of Attorney, Caregiving, Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease

What Taxes are Due When Children Inherit Home?

The first issue to address is whether the will addresses how inheritance taxes will be paid, says nj.com recent article entitled “My adult kids inherited a home. What taxes are due?” The mortgage may say the estate itself will pay it before anything is paid out to beneficiaries, or it may not mention anything.

Iowa, Kentucky, Nebraska, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania are the only states that impose an inheritance tax, which is a tax on what you receive as the beneficiary of an estate.

Maryland is the one state that has both an inheritance tax and an estate tax. Its inheritance tax is up to 10%. As to the others, Nebraska’s inheritance tax can be as high as 18%. Kentucky and New Jersey both taxes inheritances at up to 16%. Iowa’s inheritance tax is up to 15%, as is Pennsylvania’s.

Spouses and certain other heirs are usually excluded by the state from paying inheritance taxes.

A child may have an issue if there’s not enough liquidity in the estate, separate from the house to pay the taxes. If the beneficiaries plan to keep the home, they’d need to take an additional mortgage.  They’d also need to find enough cash to pay the inheritance taxes due.

In the example above, if the deed is transferred to a niece and nephew, the executor should hire a licensed real estate appraiser and pay for a date of death appraisal on the property. That appraisal will determine how much capital gains was exempted at the sister’s passing. It will also establish a new basis for capital gains purposes for the niece and nephew.

If the heirs simply do nothing and move into the house, the inheritance tax will come due. In New Jersey, it’s due eight months from the date of death.

If the inheritance tax isn’t paid, liability for the unpaid tax will attach to the executor personally, often in the form of a certificate of debt attached to some asset belonging to the executor, like his or her house.

To make sure this is handled correctly, consider speaking to an experienced estate planning attorney, who can walk you through the process.

Reference: nj.com (June 14, 2021) “My adult kids inherited a home. What taxes are due?”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Wills, Inheritance, Asset Protection, Probate Attorney, Estate Tax, Inheritance Tax, Tax Planning, Financial Planning, Capital Gains Tax, Step-up Basis, Executor

Fraudsters Continue to Target Elderly

The National Council on Aging reports that seniors lose an estimated $3 billion to financial scams, which is the worst possible time in life to lose money. There’s simply no time to replace the money. Why scammers target the elderly is easy to understand, as reported in the article “Scam Alert: 4 Types of Fraud That Target the Elderly (and How to Beat Them)” from Kiplinger. People who are 50 years and older hold 83% of the wealth in America, and households headed by people 70 years and up have the highest median net worth. That is where the money is.

The other factor: seniors were raised to mind their manners. An older American may feel it’s rude to hang up on a fast-talking scammer, who will take advantage of their hesitation. Lonely seniors are also happy to talk with someone. Scammers also target widows or divorced older women, thinking they are more vulnerable.

Here are the most common types of scams today:

Imposter scams. The thief pretends to be someone you can trust to trick you into giving them your personal information like a password, access to a bank account or Social Security number. This category includes phone calls pretending to be from the Social Security Administration or the IRS. They often threaten arrest or legal action. Neither the IRS nor the SSA ever call people to ask for personal information. Hang up!

Medicare representative. A person calls claiming to be a representative from Medicare to get older people to provide personal information. Medicare won’t call to ask for your Social Security number or to obtain bank information to give you new benefits. Phone scammers are able to “spoof” their phone numbers—what may appear on your caller ID as a legitimate office is not actually a call coming from the agency. Before you give any information, hang up. If you have questions, call Medicare yourself.

Lottery and sweepstakes scams. These prey on the fear of running out of money during retirement. These scams happen by phone, email and snail mail, congratulating the recipient with news that they have won a huge lottery or sweepstakes, but the only way to access the prize is by paying a fee. The scammers might even send a paper check to cover the cost of the fee, but that check will bounce. Once you’ve sent the fee money, they’ll pocket it and be gone.

What can you do to protect yourself and your loved ones? Conversations between generations about money become even more important as we age. If an elderly parent talks up a new friend who is going to help them, a red flag should go up. If they are convinced that they are getting a great deal, or a windfall of money from a contest, talk with them about how realistic they are being. Make sure they know that the IRS, Medicare and Social Security does not call to ask for personal information.

For those who have not been able to see elderly parents because of the pandemic, this summer may reveal a lot of what has occurred in the last year. If you are concerned that they have been the victims of a scam, start by filing a report with their state’s attorney general office.

Reference: Kiplinger (June 10, 2021) “Scam Alert: 4 Types of Fraud That Target the Elderly (and How to Beat Them)”

Suggested Key Terms: Financial Scams, Imposters, Thieves, Windfalls, IRS, Medicare, Social Security, Pandemic, Elder Financial Abuse, Lottery, Sweepstakes

What to Leave In, What to Leave Out with Retirement Assets

Depending on your intentions for retirement accounts, they may need to be managed and used in distinctly different ways to reach the dual goals of enjoying retirement and leaving a legacy. It’s all explained in a helpful article from Kiplinger, “Planning for Retirement Assets in Your Estate Plan”.

Start by identifying goals and dig into the details. Do you want to leave most assets to your children or grandchildren? Has philanthropy always been important for you, and do you plan to leave large contributions to organizations or causes?

This is not a one-and-done matter. If your intentions, beneficiaries, or tax rules change, you’ll need to review everything to make sure your plan still works.

How accounts are titled and how assets will be passed can create efficient tax results or create tax liabilities. This needs to be aligned with your estate plan. Check on beneficiary designations, asset titles and other documents to make sure they all work together.

Review investments and income. If you’ve retired, pensions, annuities, Social Security and other steady sources of income may be supplemented from your taxable investments. Required minimum distributions (RMDs) from tax deferred accounts are also part of the mix. Make sure you have enough income to cover regular and unanticipated medical, long term care or other expenses.

Once your core income has been determined, it may be wise to segregate any excess capital you intend to use for wealth transfer or charitable giving. Without being set apart from other accounts, these assets may not be managed as effectively for taxes and long-term goals.

Establish a plan for taxable assets. Children or individuals can be better off inheriting highly appreciable taxable investment accounts, rather than traditional IRAs. These types of accounts currently qualify for a step-up in cost basis. This step-up allows the beneficiary to sell the appreciated assets they receive as inheritance, without incurring capital gains.

Here’s an example: an heir receives 1,000 shares of a stock with a $20 per share cost basis valued at $120 per share at the time of the owner’s death. They will pay no capital gains taxes on the gain of $100 per share. However, if the same stock was sold while the retiree owner was living, the $100,000 gain in total would have been taxed. The post-death appreciation, if any, on such inherited assets, would be subject to capital gains taxes.

Retirees often try to preserve traditional IRAs and qualified accounts, while spending taxable accounts to take advantage of lower capital gains taxes as they take distributions. However, this sets heirs up for a big tax bill. Another strategy is to convert a portion of those assets to a Roth IRA and pay taxes now, allowing the assets to grow tax free for you and your heirs.

Segregate assets earmarked for charitable donations. If a charity is named as a beneficiary for a traditional IRA, the charity receives the assets tax free and the estate may be eligible for an estate deduction for federal and state estate taxes.

Your estate planning attorney can help you understand how to structure your assets to meet goals for retirement and to create a legacy. Saving your heirs from estate tax bills that could have been avoided with prior planning will add to their memories of you as someone who took care of the family.

Reference: Kiplinger (May 21, 2021) “Planning for Retirement Assets in Your Estate Plan”

Suggested Key Terms: Legacy, Inheritance, Charitable Giving, Step-Up in Basis, Traditional IRA, Estate Planning Attorney, Capital Gains Taxes, Beneficiaries, Required Minimum Distributions, RMDs, Retirement

eNewsletter

Recent Posts
Categories
Categories